Coping With Election Anxiety

Coping With Election Anxiety

Regardless of party affiliation, the 2016 election caused anxiety for many people.

Many people are feeling election anxiety on all points of concern. There is fear of different things and the unknown variables. The known variables of distrust, contempt, and fear engulf daily life during an election, but the tension from the 2016 presidential election has built to a new high. People know so much is at stake, especially after the recent great recession.

Fear of Racism and Police

Many people have seen modern times create a more diverse public persona in this country. In the present, the peaceful multicultural environment is strained with incidents of police shootings.

Another topic of contention, undocumented immigrants, produces fear of imprisonment, separation, and violence. Children are fearful for their family and friends and showing heightened anxiety directly related to the national election commercials, talk and family dynamics.

Lack of Trust in Politicians

Trust diminishes among voters as the dependable political representatives no longer talk about how they will represent them. The personal verbal assaults replaced the issues of the election. Constitutional, personal, and safety rights are no longer guaranteed. When most everything you believe is up for grabs it creates anxiety.

Topics of Election Anxiety

  • Insurance: will you have it and at what cost?
  • Hacking: Personal and political information not secure.
  • Transparency: Fact checking and lies exposed.
  • Gun rights: How far should legislatures go in limiting firearms?
  • Race relations: Why are some races being singled out and how do we fix it?
  • Safety officers: Law enforcement protection, training, and limits of authority.
  • Social Media bombardments: The memes, ads, caricatures, false reports are harmful and the ‘hide’ button is a great resource to keep friendships and family in perspective.

Ways to Reduce Election Anxiety

  • Do your own research of the issues so you know the truth.
  • Take a break from Social Media to avoid false articles, negativity and to relate to your friends on a friendly level.
  • Vote your conscience and convictions.
  • Talk to a like-minded family member or friend about your fears.
  • Exercise and do fun things not relating to the election.
  • Talk to a professional for an objective ear to voice your fears and to find a way to deal with election anxiety.

Once the election concludes the anxiety will not necessarily. The tools you learn to overcome the anxiety of politics continues as a source of relief. Remember who and what are important and keep doing what you do every day. When a plan helps you deal with the outcome of election anxiety then keep working toward the goal that is best for you.

Proactive Things to Do Now

  • Stay calm and do not feed into the violence, anger or alienate yourself from your family and friends.
  • Shop around for insurance which works for you.
  • Talk to your children about how to stay safe, ways to keep in touch with friends, and teach them how to take care of themselves when they are anxious.
  • Allow yourself the opportunity of open-mindedness when things do not work out perfectly.
  • Relax and enjoy the outdoors, share a laugh, talk and listen.
  • Get to know your local law enforcement officers by attending events where they are showcased.
  • Involvement in your church, community events, soup kitchens, business openings, festivals and other local events brings you closer to your neighbors, who are great assets in times of public tension.

Finding Help with Election Anxiety

Election campaigns end and new ones begin. The 2016 election season was long and grueling for many. You are not alone and certainly, do not need to suffer the anxiety alone. Election Anxiety is real and documented. Real issues have real solutions and actions for relief. Fear is an emotion and is easily reduced when the truth of why you are afraid and how to empower your thoughts is found.

When you need help working out your election anxiety or to talk to someone who cares please contact me; I'm hear to listen and help.

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